FEVER: D2, Shatta Wale, and a Genius’ Selection

It may not dominate the airwaves like it did back in 2013, the year of its release. However, on the random days one’s mind calls it up, D2’s “Fever”...

It may not dominate the airwaves like it did back in 2013, the year of its release. However, on the random days one’s mind calls it up, D2’s “Fever” resuscitates talk about its place among modern Ghanaian classics.

The justification about the song’s candidature is warranted, for it is a smooth discharge of auditory pleasures. Transported on palatable medium tempo whipped up by Genius Selection, whose genius also colours a substantial volume of Trigmatic’s discography, “Fever” is shored up by a key fitment: the clever vocal additions by Shatta Wale, at a time when he was entrenching himself as “dancehall king inna di whole Ghana.”

Published under Dynamic Records, the joint is likely the shiniest spot in the duo’s career, which seems to have ebbed in the years that have followed its publication. Whatever the state of their professional journey currently, they can raise a toast to what a dazzling entry “Fever” turned out to be.

When it first dropped, it straightaway found utility as an antidote to the lacklustre dance party; exciting female girths and prompting male bounce. These days, it summons those wild nights in gleeful nostalgia.   

Genre-wise, “Fever” gracefully straddles a tightrope: there are footings of highlife as there are of dancehall, making it appealing to a plural pop audience.

“Fever” stands on the following thesis, introduced delicately by Duke, the singer half of D2, in the song’s opening verse: a coquette working her waist at a party, her body language so thrilling, it stirs up a fever. The bait is taken. By the end of the night, someone is bedding someone. When Shatta Wale brags: “Girl know seh me gat di item,” he’s suggesting firm muscles in the groin area. The tone is not different from his colleagues on the track; their innuendo-dominated rhymes and sly onomatopoeias driving the point of their carnal hankering home.

Some songs thrive on golden melodies and stimulating instrumentation. Others rely on airtight lyrical flow. Others still, depend on the star power of their guests. “Fever” draws from all the above, and leaves little to reproach.

Pop writer from Accra.

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