Prince Bright’s midas burst on #Oofeetsɔ

Every chorus that Buk Bak’s Prince Bright has dealt out in his spotless career comes highly recommended. The man is a generous hook apparatus. A twenty-plus-year catalogue substantiates this....
Prince Bright | Ace Photography

Every chorus that Buk Bak’s Prince Bright has dealt out in his spotless career comes highly recommended. The man is a generous hook apparatus. A twenty-plus-year catalogue substantiates this. For good measure, I refer you to his midas burst on Oofeetsɔ, Sarkodie’s last great hit.

Here, it is virtually expected for “Christmas bangers” to die with the year in which they are issued. Oofeetsɔ’s staying power—well into 2020, and making it a leading contender for “Most Popular Song of the Year” at the impending VGMAs— is uncommon, and can almost exclusively be ascribed to Prince Bright’s top-shelve vocals, which are deployed across a scrumptious chorus and coda.

Usually, on a joint involving Sarkodie, one should not be able to name another as the star, whoever they may be (evidence to Sarkodie’s deserved status as a living legend). Prince Bright’s scene-stealing performance may induce head-scratching among a few—till they take a deep dive into the veteran singer’s vocal credentials, that is. Like the SarkCess man, Prince Bright is a legend too—only more so. Significantly more so.

Bolstered by hard-hitting drum patterns from Posigee protégé, MOG, Oofeetsɔ’s hook arrives as a work of versatile utility: it is as theme music for champions, but also lands with a mischievous ring, making it applicable as a diss record, too. Translated from the Ga dialect, “oofeetsɔ” works both as praise to a winner, and caution to apostles of envy and spite (captured in “skin pain,” a local jargon cunningly employed in the last line of the hook).

Prince Bright’s armoury is not restricted to the evergreen silkiness of his voice, or his sleekness as a polyglot. Whatever language one is hearing him discharge his melodies in (he sneaks in three on Oofeetsɔ), one appreciates time-honoured astuteness and rib-tickling humour. If you want to see these sonic components come together on a full body of work, his 2019 collection, the EP christened 11: 11 – The Awakening is a beginner’s guide. On how he conjures this as a bandmate, one can turn to the numerous Buk Bak albums.

A wise-cracking Sarkodie, we know. A chest-thumping one, we’re familiar with. But, perhaps, since Adonai, never has a guest organised the rapper’s attributes with groove and class that feels garden-fresh and dance-worthy like Prince Bright has. Therefore, not only did the Prince Bright-assisted song crown last year for Sarkodie, but, as the evidence suggests, it also set the tone for his 2020.

Pop writer from Accra.

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