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FEATURE: Of the 2017 Ghana Music Awards

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Medikal didn’t perform his hit single Too Risky in full. Towards the end of the song –the last in a quick playlist for his set, he pulled girlfriend Deborah Vanessa by the hand a bit too strongly, plucked his white face towel from a prop behind him, and vanished through the exit to the left. “Forget everybody!”, he yelled, finally. That gesture was a manifestation of his frustration at what a fiasco the night was turning out for him.

If the AMG Business rapper had lost out on any of the six other categories he had been nominated in at Saturday night’s VGMAs, surely, he was not going to lose out on Best New Act – but he did, to a relatively less popular Fancy Gadam –and that has made all the difference. Well, that, and a couple of other things.

It is in the nature of award schemes to render jaw-dropping moments, and the Ghana Music Awards is no exception. So, it is important for us all to calm down at some point. Still, some surprises are more surprising than others – like the curious case of Medikal etc.

Medikal was overly optimistic about a happy ending to his first ever VGMAs. It started several weeks earlier. In Still Pampee, a single he released immediately the nominees were announced, he bragged: “small boy wonder, seven nominations/sake of I be the best inna the nation”. Though his losing out on all 7 awards is both unfair and enough to significantly break his spirit, it is yet another sad tale of what an artist’s inability to manage his optimism with this scheme (which has failed many acts before him) can lead to.

Reggae singer Ras Kuuku also tasted this sour lesson when he lost both Reggae/Dancehall categories to Stonebwoy. Earlier on the red carpet, he had joked that his votes were the reason for perceived “over voting this year”, exuding wonderful fearlessness in spite of Stonebwoy et al, his competition. First of all, no Reggae/Dancehall category today, which has Stonebwoy in there as a nominee, is exactly a fair fight. Still, the Puom regent was shocked. Disgusted. He shot to his feet. His hype man too. And then he roared something at hostess Anita Erskine, who interpreted it as an answer to the question she had just asked: who picks up Artist of the Year? Fumed, both artist and hype man made for the exit to the back of the auditorium. They walked past many faces too frozen in bewilderment to say a word. At the exit, Ras Kuuku turned sharply, and yelled “akronfuo nkuaa”“Thieves!”, presumably at organisers.

Ras Kuuku

A similar incident from 2013 immediately replaced in my eyes, the episode they had just witnessed –incidentally, also dancehall-related. Shatta Wale had just lost Reggae/Dancehall Song of the Year to Kaakie, and it had proven too much to contain. Kicking angrily, he bawled in Pidgin, a similar sentiment – he was being cheated by the system. It appears that the incident served as springboard for his widespread stardom thereafter…starting with with diss songs at Kaakie and Charterhouse. Will we witness something similar with Kuuku in coming years? Does this mark a true entry to mainstream circles? Well…

Recurring technical glitches held up the main event till half -past 10, though a glamorous red carpet session earlier had passed off perfectly. It was hosted by Berla Mundi and Elikem Kumordzie, and as usual, witnessed elegance and strange fashion in equal measure. Unlike Berla, this was a new challenge for actor/ designer Elikem, who goes by the alias “The Tailor”. Many feared (seeing how he’s a respected name in contemporary Ghanaian style, but has not accrued as much experience as host of events thus) that he was a wild card, in the sense that he would bring onboard a ravenous desire to impose his fashion awareness on guests, or that he would be intimidated by the platform of the VGMA red carpet. But as it turned out, he was the perfect mélange of both worlds. He did dispatch his role remarkably, with charm and genuineness, eloquence and appeal.

Elikem The Tailor

Patrons grew impatient because the main event was dragging, significantly, and major embarrassment loomed. Organizers kept running around in frenzied efforts to rectify what looked like a power emergency –something many claim to be an attempt to sabotage the event. By whom? I don’t want any trouble.

“At exactly 8.40 pm, just at the strike of the drum for the amazing opening performance by the Accra Symphony Orchestra and Lumina, we suddenly lost all power losing some equipment in the process. The fluctuations that would follow are simply unprecedented and inexplicable. Regrettably the event started 2 hours later than scheduled; for which we are deeply sorry”, an official press statement from Charterhouse explained.

Eventually (and thankfully), the show was back up, and the Accra Symphony Orchestra returned to complete a compelling opening act which was truncated the first time due to the technical situation. A superb mix of spoken word, choral arrangements and indigenous rhythms, it proved to be a rich journey through the various stages in the development of music from these parts.

The whole country shuts down for this night when it come around. It is the one thing social media discusses, and there’s a massive yearn for television viewing. More than six television channels on Free-to-air (FTA) and Pay TV got rights to show the event this year, and Vodafone’s livestream of the event was widely patronised, especially internationally.  Like it usually is with football, it is highly emotional business, and the debates can be very political.

The 18th edition, the Vodafone-sponsored Ghana Music Awards main event was compered by seasoned broadcaster Anita Erskine. She was aided on the turntables by Joy FM’s DJ Black in the shadows behind. With his familiar Big Brother-esque baritone and nimble music fingers, he provided expert support for Erskine, who ran the prestigious event with the facility of an experienced Waakye seller. A true master hostess, she serves as the only female superintendent of the ceremony since its institution nearly two decades ago, though the likes of Doreen Andoh, Eazzy, Dentaa, Naa Askorkor and Joselyn Dumas have all been engaged in supporting roles. Switching in and out of one brilliant costume or another, and with the venerable style which is an amalgamation of superior proficiency and inborn flair, she ensured a decent flow of performances and award presentations.

Ace broadcaster Anita Erskine was host for the night

Three smiling women, clad in long cloth walked gracefully unto the stage to rousing cheers in the middle of the show. Audience members instantly recognized them from evergreen traditional band Wulomei. Equipped with an unmatched repertoire of folk classics and stage charm befitting only of legends, they affected a relatively young crowd even more efficiently than contemporary performers who took to the stage. All through their act, they kept the entire audience on their feet, with the pulse of their waist twirls, and the everlasting youth of their craft.

Backed not only by a well-proven Patch Bay Band (which had produced the Instrumentalist of the Year earlier in the night) but also by an exquisite status as national symbols, these three queens curated easily and without doubt, one of the most pronounced highlights at the event in terms of performance. The perfectly reenacted konga patterns and string arrangements invoked fervent nostalgia in the marrows of a hypnotised crowd as they chanted along to timeless choruses from the immortal “KK Mingbo” medley.

This performance by Wulomei, together with an energetic rendering by another veteran act Charles Amoah (groove and ponytail intact even after this many decades), demonstrated to all – audience and young performers alike, the permanence of true class. You could be told, or even read about it, but there’s always something significant about witnessing it for yourself –for what better exhibition of a stage craftsmanship demonstrative of authentic Ghanaian music than these two, to Kofi Kinaata for instance, who frequently gasped for breathe during his two-song set, and who also won big in the highlife categories –a genre which is founded on top-notch live performances? What better examples than Wulomei and Charles Amoah?

It is also admirable how gospel act Nacee was able to line up esteemed colleagues including SP Kofi Sarpong, Gifty Osei, Celestine Donkor, Ernest Opoku, and a host of others for his set. Their rendition of W’aseda Nie, the notable 2001 worship tune by mentors Stela Seal, Dorcas Appiah, Rev. Kusi Berko, Yaw Agyeman Benjamin, Nana Yaw Asare, and Amy Newman (collectively called the Gospel All Stars), was both a refreshing and worthy tribute in a year specifically set aside for reflection and remembering heroes.

Nacee

Without debate, this year was one for Gospel. Nacee snatched Album of the Year from favourite M.anifest, who had a great night by the way –walking home with laurels for Hip-hop Song of the Year, and Best Rapper of the Year, and making bold artistic impressions with the help of broadcaster/ choral singer Kokui, Worlasi, and monster deck handler DJ Keyzuz. Joe Mettle won for Best Male Vocal Performance (usually won by secular acts), and Artist of the Year – the first Gospel act to achieve it since that award was named as the most coveted.

Controversial or not, Joe Mettle winning Artist of the Year is an important statement for the gospel fraternity, who had embarked on a massive campaign weeks before, arguing that he was not merely good enough to be nominated for the ultimate prize, but was good enough to win it too, despite EL, and Stonebwoy, and MzVee, and Medikal, and Sarkodie. People wondered what “true hit song” he had released in the year under review, or whether his visibility all through the year surpassed his competitors, but the masterminds behind the campaign of “Gospel Artist can be Artist of the Year too” would not be distracted. Articles flooded the internet and print media, pointing out his numerous  achievements in 2016. UK-based Sonnie Badu, Jeshrun Okyere, and Nacee, and a host of other gospel acts all publicly backed their comrade. It worked. He won it. Nacee, when he was on the red carpet, or when he went up to pick his own awards, was steadfast in his solidarity with Joe Mettle for Artist of the Year. When Mettle was announced, it was as though it was he (Nacee) who had won. Together with Jesrun Okyere and other fraternity colleagues also overcome with the joy of this victory, Nacee joined Mettle onstage, screaming and patting him on his back and shoulder.

But this is what is sobering, like it or not: the ambience in the auditorium was bereft of the pandemonium usually accompanying that ultimate announcement. A similar air hovered when Nacee beat M.anifest to win Album of the Year, or when former Dobble member Paa Kwesi went up to accept the prize for Most Popular Song of the Year. Dobble’s Christy was popular, but it won the award ahead of  such songs as Joey B’s You x Me, Sarkodie’s RNS, Article Wan’s  Solo, FlowKing Stone’s Go Low, Stonebwoy’s People Dey etc.  On all three occasions, there was a near-tactile mood of  “did they really deserve it?”. That question always rises the morning after the night before, so we shall leave it at that.

It appears that because Joe is a Gospel singer, and Ghanaians a very religious people, one can’t contest what credentials got him to beat EL, Stonebwoy, MzVee, Medikal, Sarkodie without being perceived as “touching God’s anointed and doing His prophet harm”. Joe may have deserved the award on merit, but eventually, the entire nation must be sufficiently convinced of that, else in the future, there’ll be a similar agenda by the jazz community, or the Traditional Music community, or the accapella community once they chalk slight mainstream recognition, all to solicit a kind of affirmative action at the detriment of those truly deserving…as versus putting in the work and actually earning it, and that will not necessarily be a good look for a scheme already considered suspect by many.

“As children of God, sometimes we get things we don’t deserve”, is simply Joe’s response to skeptics of his mettle as far as the Artist of the Year was concerned. A profound statement, it also somewhat fuels the debate concerning whether was his mettle soley that got him the award.

VGMA 2017 Artist of the Year, Joe Mettle

Joe Mettle dedicated the award to music maestro, the late Minister Danny Nettey, who has been a major influence in his current success. To fellow  gospel acts, Joe pointed to a silver lining: “As you all know, this is for gospel, this is for Christianity. And for every gospel musician in this house, the door is open.”

 

The 2017 Ghana Music Awards is a Charterhouse Ghana production. It is sponsored by telecoms giant Vodafone. Previous winners of the topmost prize include Akyeame (1999), Daddy Lumba (2000), Kojo Antwi (2001), Lord Kenya (2002), Kontihene (2003), V.I.P (2004, 2011), Obour (2005), Ofori Amponsah (2006), Samini (2007), Kwaw Kese (2008), Okyeame Kwame (2009), Sarkodie (2010, 2012), R2Bees (2013), Shatta Wale (2014), Stonebwoy (2015), and E.L (2016).

 

Here are more photos from the event:

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STIRRING UP THE WATA MATA: #ChaleWote2017 – Day 2 ROUNDUP [+images]

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Day 2 of CHALE WOTE 2017 began on Tuesday afternoon with Open Surgery, a creative fiction writing workshop led by award-winning Ghanaian author, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, for 8 writers selected through an open call. The laid-back event held on the ground floor of Brazil House was less workshop-style and more informal and open with very interactive conversations between writers who were either meeting for the first or the umpteenth time, united by an undying passion for sharing pieces of themselves and their communities through the stories they weave.

Nii Ayikwei Parkes taking leading the Open Surgery writing workshop as part of  CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

The selected writers – young, bold and unafraid to put their work up for scrutiny – read excerpts from their submitted pieces and received unbiased, encouraging and invaluable feedback from each other, Parkes and witnesses present. The feedback touched on everything from language, pacing, creating unboxed writing styles, characterization, and setting. The best part, however, was that it was all so organic. One participant, Temitayo Johnson, commented on how this workshop was a much better learning experience than all the creative writing classes she’d had combined.

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

 

Each writer got a front-row seat into the perspectives and interpretations of their work through fresh eyes that posed delicate questions, offered advice and inspired the writers to be like WATA MATA, constantly flowing and most importantly, enjoying the process of creating and being, echoing Nii Ayikwei Parkes’ counsel that, “if you’re not having fun writing, then stop!”. Some of the stories touched on family, intimacy, identity, and even psychedelic road trips with a host of themes that explored what it means to be human.

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

Nii Ayikwei Parkes together with participants such as Mohammed Naseehu Ali (The Prophet of Zongo Street), Nii Nikoi Kotei, Poetra Asantewaa, Kweku Benneh, crazinisT artisT, and Temitayo Johnson kept the energy going with thoughtful feedback, constructive criticism and golden writing advice. A key takeaway from the writing workshop organized in collaboration with the Ama Ata Aidoo Centre for Creative Writing was for writers to “read the stuff that moves you and resonates with the stories you want to write.”

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

U.S. based researcher and artist April Bey then stirred up WATA MATA at the National Theatre (Folkspace) with her talk, “Dolezalism and Jollof Rice from 6-8pm. Originally from the Bahamas, Bey’s lecture systematically unveiled the whole trans-racial saga that broke out in 2015 with controversial figure Rachel Dolezal. She began by going through Dolezal’s background as a fine artist and her fixation on painting the bodies of young black boys and how this may be an indicator of the state of Dolezal’s mental health. Bey also touched on the mainstream media’s portrayal of the whole affair, especially the difference in interpretation around Blackness and cultural appropriation between media and inter-African communities. For April, it is important to push beyond binaries and understand the background behind Dolezal’s evolution before one can grasp her motives and understand why her identification as “trans-black” is problematic.

As an artist herself, April Bey’s personal body of work, including a new analogue printing technique that producers laser print quality and was developed whilst in Ghana last year on residency, will debut at the festival and interrogate the aesthetic qualities attached to race. She also debuted the cover of Jollof Magazine, a fictitious magazine she created, with Rachel Dolezal on the cover of the first edition as well as some of her work installed in the Bahamas which are centred on the nuanced portrayals of Blackness in art. Our understandings of race and culture and even appropriation are at least partly determined by our geographical contexts and social environments.

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

April Bey’s focus as an artist and researcher during her lecture went beyond trying to find out if Rachel Dolezal, sorry, Nkechi Amare Diallo (Dolezal’s new legal name) would like Jollof Rice to debunk the myth of trans-racialism. However, she explicitly explained why race structures cannot be binary and in fact extends beyond two simple choices like right and wrong to a much more elaborate and delicate network of personality traits, shared memories and experiences collectively making up a person’s race.

Participating artist Lineo Segoete CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

Day 3 of CHALE WOTE 2017 (Wednesday, August 16) includes more open Gallery events. “DISPERSED” featuring the work of 3 UK female artists from the Black British Female Artist(BBFA) Collective and 3 Ghanaian female artists opens today at the Nubuke Foundation (Lome Close, East Legon Accra), 10am – 5pm. Elisabeth Efua Sutherland also outdoor’s ”Deverb” – a sound and video experiment using women’s song traditions of Fanti culture as a sonic base to explore the role and importance of woman as griot in Akan society at Terra Alta (Abelemkpe Junction, next to Lucas College) at 6PM.

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

Check out the Open Gallery Program for all the other tours going on. The exhibition at Brazil House is also open throughout the week and features the work of Ghana-based and international artists on both floors of the building.


CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival 2017

Source: KaDi Yao Tay & Hakeem Adam /Accra[dot]alt
Photos: Nii Kotei Nikoi & Abdul Arafat

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Miss Commonwealth Ghana Princess Duncan visits Swedru and Cape Coast Chiefs ahead of the Fetu and Akwambo festivals (IMAGES)

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Miss Commonwealth Ghana 2017, Princess Duncan has called on the chiefs and people of Swedru and Cape Coast respectively ahead of the Akwambo Festival and Fetu Afahye.

Ms Duncan explained that she visited the Chiefs as a daughter of the land and to seek their blessings she represents Ghana later this year at the Miss Commonwealth 2017 in the UK.I decided to pass by to wish Osabarima, chiefs, and people of Oguaa season’s greetings and support to make the celebrations a success”.

” I decided to visit Osabarima Kwesi Atta (Omanhene of Cape Coast), Nana Botwe (Omanhene of Swedru), and people of Oguaa and Swedru season’s greetings and support to make the celebrations a success”.

See Photos:

 

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3 DAYS TO GO! Shatta Wale, Falz, Tekno, OTHERS return to NYC for One Africa Music Fest!

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Ghanaian dancehall icon Shatta Wale returns to New York City for the much-anticipated annual mega-concert One Africa Music Festival.

Ghana’s sole representative, he joins a tall list of colleagues from around the continent –mostly Nigerian and East African: Timaya, Flavour, Falz, Victoria Kimani and a host of others.

Last year, the event was held in the famous Barclays Centre and Houston’s Toyota Centre, with Wizkid, Stonebwoy, D’banj, Jidenna, Flavour, Seun Kuti, Banky W among others all making a strong case for talent from the continent.

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Dr. James Orleans Lindsay dines with LEAD SERIES TRIVIA CHALLENGE winners

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Ahead of the fourth edition of the LEAD SERIES, Dr. James Orleans Lindsay (CEO of JL Properties),  has spent an intimate session with the winners of the LEADS SERIES Trivia challenge at a dinner night in dinner night  Tang Palace Hotel in Accra.

This opportunity afforded the winners (Julia Amoo and David Dela Sunu) to have a personal interaction with Dr. James Orleans-Lindsay over meals and drinks as they spoke on several of issues.

The winners expressed joy and gratitude for the occasion to know more about Dr., James Orleans-Lindsay work life and personality.

LEAD series is an event organized by OMNIS2131 to afford personalities from all works of life to tell their untold stories and inspire others to greatness.

Personalities who have been hosted in this series include Hipline founder Reggie Rockstone, Event Factory Ghana CEO Nabil Alhassan, and celebrity blogger Ameyaw Kissi Debrah. The next session is slated for the 27th of August 2017 at the African Regent Hotel.

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#ChaleWote2017 – Day 1 ROUNDUP [+images]

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The end of a trilogy of themes, CHALE WOTE 2017 began on Monday evening with a captivating journey exploring African Electronics(2015) and Spirit Robot (2016) and finally landing in WATA MATA (2017). The opening ceremony for the 7th annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival took place at the ACCRA [dot] ALT space in James Town, Brazil House yesterday as “The Day of ReMembering” and an opening exhibition for CHALE WOTE 2017. The 7th edition of the street art festival themed WATA MATA, was marked by spectacular live performances, a preview of what the packed festival week of exhibitions, film screenings, workshop labs, artists talks, mixers and live art performances has in store.

 

ACCRA [dot] ALT co-director Sionne Neely speaking at the opening exhibition of CHALE WOTE 2017 || Photo; Nii Kotei Nikoi

Logistics Coordinator with ACCRA [dot] ALT and James Town resident, Samoa Mark-Kpakpo Hansen, opened the event by contextualizing what WATA MATA means within this environment. Also a Ga traditional priest, Samoa poured libations and opened the communication channels. He discussed the division of religion and science and connected this to how water is a sacred form of life, autonomy, community and imagination. Samoa’s interpretation of WATA MATA is as a binding agent, both spiritually and physically, especially in James Town where life is centred around the ocean, and therefore, can be used as a potent tool or technology to generate our deepest visions.

 

Logistics Coordinator with ACCRA [dot] ALT and James Town resident, Samoa Mark-Kpakpo Hansen contextualizing WATA MATA at the opening exhibition  || Photo: Nii Kotei Nikoi

Following this opening, the audience witnessed the “Badboy BODY Electronics” of the Hutor Adzimashie Bali and the Hu-Koku Association. These men of steel from the Torgbui Adzima Shrine in Torgodo, Volta Region sparked a fire with their electrifying performance practice. The ensemble – including dancers and musicians – showed how internal technologies can take over as the men taunted and defied death many times – cutting their faces, torsos, necks and limbs with long knives; bathing their bodies in fire; and disgorging long spools of thread.

Another enthralling performance took place with Tifali Cultural Consults, a 25-women performance art collective, exploring the move to Spirit Robot, the theme for CHALE WOTE 2016, where pan-African imaginative visions link up to form a structure or system that we can all tap into for resources when needed. Their performance art piece entitled “K3 Yei (…and the women…)”, used an innovative mix of contemporary and traditional dance with music exploring the love, verve, warrior spirit and solidarity of women-based practices.

“Badboy BODY Electronics” by Hutor Adzimashie Bali and the Hu-Koku Association at the opening exhibition of CHALE WOTE 2017 || Photo: Nii Kotei Nikoi

A special part of The Day of ReMembering was how performers, CHALE WOTE artists, James Town residents and audience members partook in this collective and sacred cleansing process. Together we recollect the traumatic histories experienced in James Town through the transatlantic enslaved trade but we also bear witness to how we can regenerate and innovate our historical realities. Members of the Hu-Koku Association, Samoa Mark-Kpakpo Hansen and STELOO led a wondrous procession from Brazil Lane to James Fort’s Oyenyi Gardens, a former prison that also once held Dr. Kwame Nkrumah for 10 months prior to Ghana’s independence.

“K3 Yei” by Tifali at the opening exhibition of CHALE WOTE 2017 || Photo: Nii Kotei Nikoi

STELOO, on a trolley outfitted with fat speakers and a large-winged white suit, set a melancholic mood in motion with spellbinding electronic and ambient music for the walk, re-centering James Town’s vast historical importance to the country and West Africa, as a major point of capture/departure for the enslaved, and therefore, the portal for re-entry and reunification of African peoples.

STELOO leading the procession from Brazil Lane to James Fort’s Oyenyi Gardens || Photo: Nii Kotei Nikoi

The exhibition at Brazil House is open throughout the week and features the work of Ghana-based and international artists on both floors of the building. Day 2 of CHALE WOTE 2017 (Tuesday, August 15) features a creative writing masterclass led by Nii Ayikwei Parkes, Director of the Ama Ata Aidoo Centre for Creative Writing at Brazil House (bottom floor) for 8 selected writers from 2-4:30pm. Following this, CHALE WOTE 2017 participant, April Bey (U.S.), delivers a lecture, shares some screenings and takes part in a Q+A with the audience on “Dolezalism and Jollof Rice”, at the National Theatre (Folkspace) from 6-8pm.

 

Ghanaian artist Sel Kofiga next to his installation, ‘Umbrage – Making Faces’ at the opening exhibition of CHALE WOTE 2017 || Photo: Nii Kotei Nikoi


See more photos from Day 1 of CHALE WOTE 2017 below.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Opening events for the 2017 edition of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival.

Source: Accra[dot]alt

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Miss Ghana 2017 Wraps Up Bolga Audition

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Bolgatanga, capital of the Upper East Region, received the Miss Ghana 2017 audition train with such razzmatazz, as the team touched down for this year’s audition in the region.

After paying courtesy calls on the Regional Minister, touring the region’s historical tourist sites (Paga Crocodile Pond, Pikworo slave camp, smock market, Tenzu Shrine of Tongo Hills) and being interviewed by some of the regions media houses; the team headed to the plush Akayet Hotel for the exercise.

The audition was impressively attended by ladies in the region and they delivered their very best, making it extremely difficult for the judges; Inna Mariam Patty, Mr. Humphrey (General Manager Akayet Hotel) and Miss Ghana Ambassador, Afua Asieduwaa Akrofi – to settle on the top six (6).

However, after an exciting yet grueling session, only six (6) were selected for the final leg of audition in Accra. They were; Felica Mahama, Rahinatu Issifu, Hamida Yakubu, Zita Naab, Millicent Yeboah and Emmanuela Mbangiba.

Exclusive Events Ghana Ltd powers Miss Ghana in collaboration with the Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture and Ghana60Years On Planning Committee, with support from National Lottery Authority, Intercity STC, NIB, Glam’s Make Up, ABC Hair Relaxer, NPA, IPMC and supported by Ghana Police Service, GOIL, Akosombo Textile Limited, Ritel Ghana, DDP, Primus Water, Pippa’s Health Centre, Hungarian Trade & Cultural Center (HTTC), Hungary Embassy, Nasco Electronics, Special Ice Water, Akayet Hotel, Global Dream Hotel & Service Apartments, Tang Palace, Aqua Safar Resort, JIL, Amazing U, Hottees, Poquaa Accessories, Accents & Curve, Queens Touch Décor, Forever Easy, Goodluck Africa, Limpex Impressions, Starbow Airline, Holiday Inn Hotel, Caesars Casino, Asantewaa Premier Guesthouse, Best Western Atlantic Hotel Takoradi, Skyplus Hotel Ho, Samit Hotel, Tyco Hotel, Royal Cozy Hotel, Busua Beach Resort, Eusbet Hotel, Eastgate hotel, Grand Casamora, Raybow Hotel, Lizzy’s Sports Complex, Hottees, Magnum Force Securities, High End Production, Purple Room Lingerie, Yummie Noodles, La Chaumiere restaurant, Buka Restaurant, Koko King, La Galette, PadThai Restaurant, Regal Chinese Restaurant, Bush Canteen, Café Mundo, Gold Coast Restaurant, Jamrock restaurant, Flair catering, and Pink Panda.

Miss Ghana is also supported by the following media: Daily Guide, BF &T, Ghanaian Times, Spectator, Finder, Showbiz, Citi FM, Live FM, Starr FM, Peace FM, Maxx FM, Dess FM, Ark FM, ATL FM, Shine, W93.5 FM, Bugli FM, Word FM, Tanga FM, Bishare FM, North Star FM, Kekeli FM, Classic FM, KTU Radio, FM, NKWA FM, Thank U FM, Metro TV, UTV TV Africa, Homebase, TV 7,  Atinka TV, ZTV, Katanka,  NTV, SET TV, Adehye TV, Sparkle TV.

 

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