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Photography & Spoken Word

PHOTOGRAPHER Eric Gyamfi CELEBRATES Ghanaian LGBT community with LATEST PROJECT

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Ghanaian -born photographer Eric Gyamfi documents the lives of a section of Ghanaian LGBT families with compelling   new pieces for the New York Times.

Titled “Just Like Us”, the projects offers rare everyday images of  lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in a country where it remains illegal.

S. meets A., her girlfriend, after work. S. is a musician and A. is studying feminism and climate change for her master’s degree.
Names have been abbreviated to protect the subjects in these photos.

H., A., O., M., and Y. hanging out on a weekend when one of H.’s friends got married.

Some of the L.G.B.T. community members organize a night of dance after an International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia event as a way to get to know other community members and network.

Sunday at the beach with K.

A. doing her friend I.’s hair. N., the young boy who leans on I.’s legs, is her son from a previous relationship.

C., who is Hindu, teaches children at the Mandir. C. is the only Hindu in an otherwise Christian family. “I had to find a way to stay religious without feeling nervous or guilty about my sexuality. Here, at the temple, I find that peace, rid of all forms of guilt,” he said. His siblings visit the Mandir with him every once in a while.

“Someday, soon, I’d have to live as a straight man,” J. told the photographer one afternoon after school. “I think about that every day.”

O. lives with H. in his family house. She considers H. a brother.

H. performing in drag.

H. and his boyfriend, M.

S., who is gay, contemplating his imminent marriage to a woman. His wife was selected for him by his family. “I need a child,” he said. “My parents are demanding a grandchild, too.”

K., A.’s boyfriend, spending a hot afternoon outside with friends.

L. and N. met through a mutual friend and have been together since September 2014. L. moved out of her home when she was 17 and has been living on her own since. “I try not to make friends. That way, I keep people away from my private life as their questions and suspicions never get answered nor confirmed,” she told the photographer. “We keep a close circle of friends who are mostly just like us. It’s not the best way to live but it has worked for us thus far.”

A. after a dance session. “My stepfather is very open minded,” he said. “I can sense that he is not so happy about dance as he doesn’t think I can make a career out of it. but he is happy that I am happy when I dance so that’s good for me. The first song I usually dance to is my father’s.”

H.’s family making spring rolls and pies for O.’s mother’s funeral celebration. H. played a key role in the organization of the funeral rites with O.’s family.

A. examining herself in her bathroom mirror.

N., R., and N.’s nephew cleaning in the morning. N. and R. have been together for nearly two years and live together. N. is a chef and R. is a musician.

A. and K., and little A., making rice balls for lunch. A. and K. are a couple and have been living together for almost two years. Little A., who lives in the same compound house, spends time with them when she is not school.

 

Photo credit: Eric Gyamfi /Nytimes.com

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Photography & Spoken Word

#ENEWSGHPoeticLicence: Meditation – Asford PSALM

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All men are insistently referred to as dogs;

Cliché!

It’s particularly the bane when the issuer in the instance has become the reverse of the word ‘dog’;

A god who possess omnifarious qualities.

 

What really is the issue?

Is there an err in man’s creation to be referred to as such in an ungodly norm?

Or it’s the missing part taken to create another, complete from him?

Or that, he can’t resist whatever Eve gives to him?

 

All men are dogs;

Are all dogs men?

It’s not a fair comparison by any estate.

 

Consider not even the blasphemy;

If there’s an insistent craving to refer a man to a dog, the least consideration should be;

A dog is most loyal and faithful and a good friend to man when treated well with even the least.

Own a dog and just maybe you’ll understand.

 

Asford Psalms

 

 

 

 

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Photography & Spoken Word

#ENEWSGHPoeticLicence: Daydream – Asford PSALM

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The night visions beckon me to a wake.

I have stayed all night to figure it right;

From the mammoth to its tiny bits.

 

Night is gone, day is here;

But I’m stuck in a looping rear.

For a reason or the other and though the sun is here;

It seems to have not found a way to light away my fear.

 

My arm is up and my jaw sits atop.

But in a new day I flay in the same dream non-stop.

I’m at the mercy of a night vision that won’t go away;

A day dream; one in part, the same.

When at all can I walk my thoughts?

Can I even work my thoughts?

Will it even be worth it?

 

Gracefully and all of a sudden,

A snap!

His snapping fingers won’t stop until my mind responds to him with same.

Why are you lost in your thoughts son?

You are in too deep in the wrong way.

Walk out of your thoughts and make it work;

Your thoughts on its own has no legs!

Lucky for you, you have two legs and arms too.

So make it work!

 

Asford Psalms

 

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Music

DADDY DEAREST! Sarkodie flaunts “barrister” daughter in new images

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Since she arrived in 2016, Titi (Adeline Owusu), and her father Sarkodie have been simply inseparable. His pride and joy, the adorable little girl has been the subject of endless affection not just from her rapper dad, but also from a wide section of Ghanaians.

The two have documented their close bond via many heartwarming pictures (most prominently on the album cover of hiphop act’s latest album “Highest”), often promptly becoming social media fodder.

Here’s the latest instalment, posted by the rapper on his Instagram act, and captioned “Madam Maame Adwoa Owusu Addo – Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Ghana … Chambers – @cqlegal”

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Photography & Spoken Word

#ENEWSGHPoeticLicence: Nowhere to go – ASFORD PSALM

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The first time was to be my last.

The first time was to come by and away it goes past.

But then I tasted the sweet in the crevices and the cracks;

And I have lost all haste to leave thus fast.

 

The first was to only be but the first;

Until I tasted more of its sweets.

Now it has had me mellow and my craving thirst has bid me to follow.

With nowhere to go I am an obliged fellow;

I have lost all counts and can’t keep score.

 

I am livid though I ask for more and more.

I will love to go back to where I came from.

Contrary, here I am, held against my will to the sweets of this world.

The first time was a wish;

The second was a charm;

The third meant no harm, but here I am, I have been bewitched.

And it seems there’s nowhere to go.

 

Asford Psalms

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Photography & Spoken Word

#ENEWSGHPoeticLicence: Nowhere to Go – Asford Psalms

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The first time was to be my last.

The first time was to come by and away it goes past.

But then I tasted the sweet in the crevices and the cracks;

And I have lost all haste to leave thus fast.

 

The first was to only be but the first;

Until I tasted more of its sweets.

Now it has had me mellow and my craving thirst has bid me to follow.

With nowhere to go I am an obliged fellow;

I have lost all counts and can’t keep score.

 

I am livid though I ask for more and more.

I will love to go back to where I came from.

Contrary, here I am, held against my will to the sweets of this world.

The first time was a wish;

The second was a charm;

The third meant no harm, but here I am, I have been bewitched.

And it seems there’s nowhere to go.

 

 

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Photography & Spoken Word

#ENEWSGHPoeticLicence: Escape – Asford PSALM

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Up-above or down-below, there’s so much but nothing to show.

Down-below or up-above there’s everywhere but nowhere to go.

The option is a smiling face yet a hurting heart;

A sweating face mixed with tears which cannot be abate.

A mustard seed faith which is damned by fate.

There is an exigent need to escape.

Yet; beneath the reflection is a mountain of everything and nothingness;

Its peak dwells deep down into the earth.

Beneath the reflection of this calm river are waves that speaks with no still voice.

A sun as pale as the moon;

A sky without birds;

And clouds as jagged as a curse.

Beneath the reflection is a person whose world has been turned upside down.

Exigency beckons for an escape!

But within that same reflection there cannot be an escape for the poor soul.

Escape cometh by deflection.

 

by Asford Psalm

 

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