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PricewaterhouseCoopers forecasts 2016-2020 Entertainment & media outlook for Nigeria, S. Africa, Kenya



The Internet, video games, television, and filmed entertainment segments of sub-Saharan Africa’s entertainment and media industry are projected to continue to grow in the following years but the publishing industry is having to work very hard to make any headway, according to PwC’s Entertainment and media outlook: 2016 – 2020 report (South Africa – Nigeria – Kenya) released today. Despite a relative slower growth projection for the industry, the Outlook forecasts that South Africa’s entertainment and media industry is expected to grow from R125.7 billion in 2015 to R173.3 billion in 2020, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.6%.

“In spite of widespread disruption in the entertainment and media industry, as well as intense competition for consumer attention, there are growth opportunities aplenty for companies to capitalise from in the new media landscape,” says Vicki Myburgh, Entertainment & Media Industry Leader for PwC Southern Africa.

Digital spend is expected to drive the overall growth. South Africa’s Internet access market will rise from R39.4 billion in 2015 to R68.5 billion in 2020, as broadband – both fixed and mobile – becomes an essential utility.  “Although the forecast CAGR of 11.7% is lower than previously predicted, this still makes Internet access by far the largest contributor to total E&M spend,” adds Myburgh.

The Outlook presents annual historical data for 2011 – 2015 and provides annual forecasts for 2016 – 2020 in 11 entertainment and media segments for South Africa, Nigeria, and Kenya: the Internet, television, filmed entertainment, video games, business-to-business publishing, recorded music, newspaper publishing, recorded music, magazine publishing, book publishing, out-of-home-advertising and radio.

Aside from the Internet, the Outlook predicts that growth will also be seen in the video game market, filmed entertainment and television segments. “As Internet revenue continue to rise, the forecast for newspaper and magazine circulation is on the decline as consumers migrate from print copies to free online alternatives – and aren’t as yet moving to paid digital formats in great numbers,” says Myburgh.

South Africa has the largest TV market in Africa and continues to grow strongly, with pay-TV subscription revenues expected to expand by a 5.0% CAGR to reach R25.2 billion in 2020. The video game market is also performing well and revenue is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 5.6% to reach R3.7 billion in 2020, up from R2.8 billion in 2015. Social/casual gaming revenue overtook traditional game revenue for the first time in 2015 and is expected to be the key growth area over the next five years, exceeding R2 billion by 2020.

Alongside video providers, the B2B market will be a strong source of revenue for South Africa’s entertainment and media industry over the next five years. The amount of data that businesses are using for decision-making is increasing, and the tools used to access the information are increasingly cloud-based with more and more users gaining access via mobile handsets. The market is forecast to grow at a 4% CAGR to reach just under R11.6 billion in 2020.

By contrast, the newspaper market in South Africa is expected to be R1 billion smaller than in 2015. In 2015 total newspaper revenue was worth R9.1 billion, but this figure will drop to R8.1 billion in 2020.  Circulation figures are also forecast to start declining, as price rises are unable to compensate for the declining numbers of copies sold.

By the same note, South Africa’s consumer’s magazine market is also forecast to see a decline in later years. A growing number of South Africans are accessing magazine content and websites via their smart devices, but the boom in smartphone and tablet ownership will be the biggest driver for digital magazine revenue growth over the forecast period.

Although physical music continues on its downward trajectory, it is streaming revenue that will be responsible for keeping recorded music revenue from large falls. Digital music streaming revenue is forecast to rise from R74 million in 2015 to R437 million in 2020.

The report shows that South Africa’s total entertainment and media advertising revenue is expected to rise from R43.4 billion in 2015 to R53 billion in 2020, a CAGR of 4.1%, with only newspaper advertising revenue forecast to take a downward turn. TV advertising continues to dominate the market, but Internet advertising is combining scale with a great pace of expansion, and will become the second-largest contributor to revenue by 2020.

Myburgh says: “Entertainment and media companies are facing an ever more challenging and complex environment. Companies need a more detailed understanding than ever before of the various forces at play at a local level. Armed with such insights, both established and emerging players are well-positioned to capitalise on the industry shifts and lead the next phase of growth.”


Nigeria has one of the fastest-growing markets in the entertainment and media industry. In 2015 it saw 15.7% growth to reach US$3.8 billion, and with all segments forecast to rise over the forecast period, an 11% CAGR is anticipated. Internet advertising will see the fastest growth over the forecast period, and will come predominantly in formats designed for mobiles, in keeping with the prevailing method of Internet access in the country. TV advertising is also benefitting from strong economic growth and an emerging middle class with a higher disposable income.


Kenya’s total entertainment and media industry was worth US$2.2 billion in 2015 and is expected to be worth US$3.3 billion by 2020. Internet access again will be the main contributor, if not as dominant in Kenya as in Nigeria, accounting for 43% of the total market in 2020.

Five key shifts emerge amid the continuing disruption

As these high-level trends play out, our research has pinpointed key shifts occurring in each of five dimensions of the entertainment and media landscape: demography, competition, consumption, geography, and business models. Simultaneous and interrelated, these five shifts influence and play off one another. They should serve as a serious call to action for both industry incumbents and new entrants to seek out growth opportunities in markets worldwide.

Shift 1. Demography: Youth will be served

Our analysis of national entertainment and media markets globally reveals an almost perfect correlation between the relative size of the under-35 population and growth in entertainment and media spending—confirming that younger consumers are now the primary drivers of global growth. Our analysis of total entertainment and media revenue growth in the world’s 10 youngest and 10 oldest markets in demographic terms reveals that, on average, entertainment and media spending in the 10 youngest markets is growing three times as rapidly as in the 10 oldest markets.

Shift 2. Competition: Content is still king

In a world where Netflix can launch in 130 new countries in a single day, it’s easy to assume that content is becoming more globally homogeneous. But the reality is that content is being redefined by forces of globalisation and localisation simultaneously—and that while much of the industry is growing more global, content tastes and cultures remain steadfastly local.

Shift 3. Consumption: The joy of bundles

The ability for consumers to design and curate their own media diet has been one of the most powerful trends to emerge in the industry. But the bundle is far from dead, with video and cable incumbents—which were initially slow off the mark—now fighting back by offering their content on an integrated omnichannel basis, on TV, laptop, tablet, and smartphone. As take-up of these new-style bundles grows, we believe the bulk of digital OTT mass-market services will gradually be reabsorbed into aggregated offerings that will echo the traditional analogue-style bundle, but that will be more flexibly priced and available on a full range of devices. When this happens, the competitive battle may move up a notch, as cable, technology, and telecom players fight over gaining access to distribution.

Shift 4. Geography: Growth Markets

Generally, entertainment and media companies had one set of expectations about developed markets (slow growth, low regulation, easier to access) and another about developing markets (rapid growth, high regulation, harder to access). But the dynamics are shifting rapidly as disruption pushes markets to develop in different ways, meaning “opportunity” economies—even within the same region—can display significantly varied growth patterns.

Shift 5. Business models: Transforming with trust

Today’s entertainment and media market includes technology companies racing to become hybrid content companies, and traditional publishers evolving the other way to emerge as hybrid technology companies. This underlines how the growth of technology and digitisation is acting as a centrifugal force—breaking up existing relationships; pushing large, generalist entities to give way to smaller specialists; and allowing smaller, nimble competitors to beat out incumbents. For incumbent advertising agencies, this opens up an opportunity to reorient themselves to become invaluable to markets, by bringing together programmatic capabilities, analytics, data aggregation, and native content to create the new “super” agency.


Events & Places

AfroExcellence: Sarkodie assembles heroes in “Highest Feast” [+ video]



Ace Ghanaian rapper Sarkodie, brought together various persons who have influenced his life and journey over the years in a private get-together held at his residence on Saturday, March 17.

The first of what he intends to be an annual event, the “Highest Feast”, which saw in attendance, close family, industry friends, as well as acquaintances across corporate Ghana, was, according to the SarkCess frontman, to converge under one roof, various personalities who have served as inspiration for him and his career.

“This is a gathering where I bring together a few of my closest people that I cherish, respect, and appreciate so much. The idea for the highest feast is to bring together these noble people under one roof, have a good time, and connect”, he said.

To him, it also proved a perfect opportunity to exchange success stories under a relaxing atmosphere, and refuel toward new projects.

“In life, the energy around you is very important. It can make you or break you. I choose to keep these people around me because I need that guidance”, the rapper further submits about the feast.

Well-decorated and author of multiple bestselling albums, Sarkodie ranks among elite music acts on the continent. He’s in the running for a number of award at the forthcoming 2018 VGMA Awards, including the coveted Artist of the Year prize.

Here are highlights of the event courtesy Sarkodie’s YouTube page:

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Events & Places

Miss Ghana UK 2017 Queen to “Hug Out “with tertiary students in Accra



Food for All Africa in partnership with Miss Ghana UK Foundation and Psychosocial Africa will this April bring together tertiary students within Accra to hang out with the current Miss Ghana UK Queen, Miss Sabina Lawabea Awuni at the social event aimed at promoting mental health and nutritional well being among tertiary students in Ghana.

For every case of suicide reported, five people have already contemplated committing suicide, making a total of about 200,000 people contemplating the idea annually, Sabina emphasis on the use of social get together as a means to suicide prevention as such programs tend to give people listening ears.

According to a 2012 survey conducted by the Network for Anti-suicide and Crisis Prevention in Ghana, five or more people commit suicide every day in the country.The dominant cause of their death ranged from problems with parents, failure at school, the inability of parents to provide needs, impotence and relationship related issues.

Former Chief Psychiatrist of the Accra Mental Hospital, Dr Akwesi Osei reiterates that suicide is premeditated. It is not something one does the first time he or she thinks about it.

 “There are three organizational stages of suicide, involving “getting used to,” the idea, the means and the opportunity or motivation,” he added.

He described the first stage as the preparation state where a person prepares to commit suicide. People who are naturally secretive, who come from broken homes, people with no loving childhood and people with traumatic stress disorders are susceptible.

The second, he said was the precipitate factors that triggered one to commit suicide. Some of the triggers were a financial crisis, loss of a loved one and separation.

The final stage was when victims remained in a perpetual state of the desire to kill him or herself, and with the triggers including the lack of financial support, among others.

Hug Out with Miss Ghana UK 2017, The Jubilee Queen on Saturday 7th April 2018 at Tuo Restaurant and garden on Ring road Central will be an experience sharing hang out with the Queen, Sabina Awuni, mental health advocate, Nana Abena Korkor Addo  and Chef Elijah Addo in promoting mental health and nutritional wellness among tertiary students in Ghana through activities such as cooking competition,eating,games,let’s talk and music jams.

The Queen together with SRC executives of participating schools will in the morning cook and serve breakfast to patients of Accra psychiatric hospital.



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Events & Places

Call for applications: MIAConnects Regional Mobility Programme



The Music In Africa Foundation (MIAF) is pleased to launch the regional leg of its mobility programme, which will support African music festivals wanting to programme artists from any of the following seven countries: Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria (Northern), Chad, Mali and Niger.

This regional mobility call is part of the broader Music In Africa Connects (MIAConnects) Artist Mobility Programme, which in 2017 supported more than 100 artists from countries affected by conflict to tour locally.

The value of the Regional Mobility Programme is that music festivals are now benefiting from the programme together with the artists, a development that will strengthen the live music scene on the continent.

MIAConnects is made possible with support from the Siemens Stiftung and the German Federal Foreign Office.

Please note that this call is for festivals that take place on the African continent only. The deadline for applications is 22 March 2018 (midnight CAT).

Who can submit an application?

  • This opportunity is open to music festivals based and operating on the African continent.
  • The host festival must take place between 1 May and 22 December 2018.
  • The applicant must be the registered company or organisation directly responsible for the organisation of the festival.
  • The music festival must be able to attract a considerable audience, beneficial to the invited artist(s).
  • Only festivals featuring a series of performances by various musicians and bands will be considered.
  • First-time festivals and other event formats are welcome to apply provided they meet the criteria.

Requirements and mandatory documents

  • Budgets submitted must adhere to stipulations as indicated in the call.
  • The applicant (festival) must have a valid bank account.
  • Proof will be required with regards to the festival’s ability to cover the costs of the invited music performance (refer below for costs to be covered by the festival) and to implement the festival as detailed in the application.
  • Confirmation of donors, sponsors and other financial support will have to be provided within the application form.
  • Festivals taking place in what is considered high-risk areas need to outline safety and security measures that will be taken towards the safety of the invited artist or band.
  • The applicant will be directly responsible for the preparation and management of the project (and not an intermediary).
  • The festival (the applicant) should appoint one person from the company or organisation who will be responsible for submitting the application, managing and reporting how the support has been utilised and will be the sole contact person if the application is successful.
  • An applicant may submit only one application under this call.
  • The requested amount may not exceed €5 000.
  • Registration documents for companies that are legally responsible for the implementation of the festival.
  • Legal identification documentation: Applicant’s ID/passport copy.
  • Budget: download budget template HERE and complete budget for the invited music performance (projected expenditure, in euros (€), according to the stipulations provided in this call).
  • Festival’s 2018 programme (drafts accepted).
  • Letter from the invited artist or band representative confirming availability and approving the project.

Additional attachments such as press coverage, web links, pictures and videos, etc. will be accepted as attachments to the application, but are not mandatory.

Which artists can you invite?

  • Artists from the following eligible countries: Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria (Northern), Chad, Mali and Niger.
  • The music performance must take place outside the country where the invited artist, band or music project is based.
  • Applicants may consider various categories of performers including, but not limited to, bands, solo artists, DJs (who include live performances), choirs etc. Please take note of the non-eligible performances detailed below when doing so.
  • Artistic collaboration components between musicians that lead to live music performances are welcome.
  • Preference is given to outstanding artists who are ready for the international stage and whose career will benefit from being exposed to new audiences at your event.
  • All participants must be over 18 years old.

Additional Advantageous Criteria (not mandatory)

  • Applications that include more than one performance opportunity to the invited artist(s) will be an advantage. Additional opportunities may be connections for artists to perform at other festivals, within or outside the festival’s country, to extend their tour, collaborate with other artists, etc.
  • In addition, the music festival must preferably be able to support the artist or band with exposure such as interviews and social media marketing.
  • Preference will be given to artists with limited opportunities to tour outside their country.

Non-eligible music performances/applications

  • Music performances supporting political parties or religious faith.
  • Fundraising events, such as charity galas.
  • Applications that do not fulfil the criteria.
  • Incomplete applications.

Type of support

Financial Support

Applicants may request up to €5 000.

Eligible costs that may be included in the requested amount:

  • Visa costs: Budget limit – €200.
  • Travel and transportation costs (including airport transfers and local ground transport): Budget limit – €3 000.
  • Daily meal allowance (per diem): Budget limit – max €25 per day per person and total budget must not exceed €600.
  • Accommodation: Budget Limit – max €50 per day per person and total budget must not exceed €1 200.

Budget stipulation notes

  • All budget limits mentioned above need to be strictly adhered to;
  • It is mandatory that you use the provided budget template. Click HERE to download the file (the link is also provided in the application form).

Please note that only one non-band member included in the travelling parties can be covered (manager or sound engineer).

Non-eligible costs (to be covered by the festival)

The purpose of the support is to make the mobility of the artist possible. As such, the festival will be responsible for the production and all other cost, e.g. technical support: stage, sound, lighting equipment etc.

  • Performance fees (this fee is mandatory).
  • Hospitality requirements.
  • Technical costs.
  • Publicity and marketing.
  • General running costs and overheads of the festival (organisation/company).
  • Costs that are already covered by other funding.

Administrative support

  • Administrative support via email is offered during the application process. Email
  • Additional administrative support will also be offered to successful applicants during the contracted project period.

How to apply

  • Read the call for applications carefully.
  • Create (if you haven’t already) a profile for your festival on the Music In Africa Artist & Industry section using this link: Make sure that your profile is up to date, as this is the profile that the selection committee will review. Additional content like pictures and social media links will be advantageous.

Please note: you may find your profile already created by a Music In Africa contributor. In that case, you would need to follow the online steps to claim it. Once you have control of your profile, make sure to update the information.

  • Make sure you have all the required documents.
  • Complete and submit the online application form (the link is provided at the end of this call). Two application forms are provided – in French and English. Email applications will not be considered.
  • The form will not allow applicants to save and complete later. Before you complete it, make sure you have all the required documents that will need to be attached. Required documents are clearly noted within this call for applications.

Selection process

  • The deadline for applications is 22 March 2018 (midnight CAT).
  • Successful applicants will be notified by 10 April 2018.
  • Unsuccessful applicants will not be notified.
  • Only complete applications will be considered.
  • Only applications submitted via the dedicated online form will be considered.
  • Late applications will not be considered.

Note that a copy of your application form will automatically be sent to you by email. For transparency purposes, all beneficiary names will be published on within 30 days after they have been selected.

Application forms

You can apply in French or English.

  • Access the ENGLISH application form HERE.
  • Access the FRENCH application form HERE.

For enquiries and information, email



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Events & Places

Mayorkun, Sister Afia, Magnom, Keche others storm Legon for Legon Hall/WatsUp TV Concert



Nigerian Afrobeat star and DMW signed act Mayorkun is headlining the 66th Legon Hall Week artiste night.

The Concert which is in collaboration with Watsup TV will see other top Ghanaian acts like Sister Afia,  Epixode, Magnom, Dope Nation, Keche, Rudebwoy Ranking, Gemini, Opanka, Feli Nuna, Dahlin Gage, Dee Money, Ephraim, DJ Sly, Obibini, Jason El-A and many more.

The event is sponsored by Rush Energy drink and supported by  Davido Music Worldwide, The Plug, Endowed Event, SHOB Group, Jack Daniels, GhOne TV, TV7, 369 Live and

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Events & Places

WHITE WEDDING! Ameyaw Debrah, Elsie seal their love in classy ceremony



The white wedding between famed Ghanaian blogger Ameyaw Debrah and sweetheart Elsie, came off today Trade Fair Centre in Accra. The ceremony followed a traditional marriage days ago.

The private ceremony was witnessed by close family and friends, industry colleagues, and leading showbiz names.

Founder of Ameyaw Debrah Media, the internet mogul and his wife recently welcomed Nathan, their first son.

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Events & Places

FIRST PHOTOS: White Wedding of Ameyaw Debrah currently underway…



The white wedding between ace blogger Ameyaw Debrah and sweetheart Elsie, is currently ongoing at the Trade Fair Centre in Accra. The ceremony follows a traditional marriage days ago.

The couple’s love story is being witnessed by close family and friends, industry colleagues, and leading showbiz names.

Founder of Ameyaw Debrah Media, the internet mogul and his partner recently welcomed Nathan, their first son.

See first photos and footage of the bride’s arrival:



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